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Edwin Hamblin

Edwin Hamblin

Male 1835 - 1925  (89 years)


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  • Name Edwin Hamblin 
    Born 20 May 1835  Bainbridge, Ross, Ohio, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Histories and Articles 1835-1925 
    History-Edwin and Hannah Cook Hamblin by Daniel A Reynolds 2012
    History-Edwin and Hannah Cook Hamblin by Daniel A Reynolds 2012
    Died 12 Jan 1925  Saint George, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 14 Jan 1925  Saint George City Cemetery, Saint George, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Hamblin. Edwin Hamblin 1835-1925
    Hamblin. Edwin Hamblin 1835-1925
    Plot: B_1_12_3
    PatGroverDonGroverLorettaGrover-HamblinHS -StGeorgeCemetery2003.jpg
    PatGroverDonGroverLorettaGrover-HamblinHS -StGeorgeCemetery2003.jpg
    Histories and Articles 26 Jan 1925 
    Written by George H. Crosby Jr., Green River, Wyoming 
    Article--Edwin Hamblin-Improvement Era Jan 26 1925.
    Article--Edwin Hamblin-Improvement Era Jan 26 1925.
    Age 89 years 
    Notes 
    • !HISTORY: Compiled by Ila Vee Hamblin Larsen film #1320612 item 10 SL FHL

      HISTORY OF EDWIN HAMBLIN:
      On 20 May 1835 in Bainbridge, Ohio, a new baby son was welcomed into
      the family of Isaiah and Daphne Haynes Hamblin. This son was named Edwin.
      There were also four sisters and five brothers to love and care for this new
      baby. Their names are Melissa, Emily, Olive, Amarilla, Jacob, Obed, Alson,
      William and Oscar. Two brother, Francis and Frederick, were born after Edwin
      when the family lived in Wisconsin.
      Edwin's mother, Daphne Haynes was born 29 Aug 1797 in North Hero, Vermont.
      North Hero is on Grand Island in Lake Champlain. Her parents are William and
      Polly Stoddard Haynes. They came to Vermont from Massachusetts as did the
      Hamblins. Edwin's family lived in North Hero for awhile, then went to northern New York
      where his father worked for a timber company. Next they moved to north eastern
      Ohio, then to Ross county, Ohio where Edwin was born. In about 1838 they moved
      to Spring Prarie, Wisconsin. It was a beautiful place with rolling hills. Edwin
      and his brothers and sisters must have enjoyed playing and roaming the rolling
      grassy hillsides. Even though he was young, he probably helped care for his
      younger brothers as well as the animals. The family probably intended to stay
      there permanently, but they hadn't planned on joining the newly restored Church
      of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints which greatly changed their lives. Jacob,
      oldest son of Isaiah and Daphne, joined this church known as the "mormon"
      church in 1842. Jacob and his family went to Nauvoo, Illinois to live with the
      main body of the church.
      Jacob came to visit his parents and convinced them to come to the April
      conference of the church in Nauvoo in 1845. Earlier, as Isaiah had been near
      death, Jacob had given him a blessing. The parents went with Jacob, and while
      there asked to be baptized into the church. Jacob baptized them on 11 Apr 1845.
      The parents remained there and the rest of the family joined them. They settled
      at Ellison, Illinois near Nauvoo. Edwin was ten at the time. He most likely met
      Brigham Young and other church leaders. Work was progressing quickly on the new
      temple, despite the great persecution against the Church. The Saints were
      determined to have it dedicated before they were driven from their beautiful
      city.
      Isaiah and his older sons worked on the temple. Daphne and her daughters did
      sewing for the temple curtains.
      All of the persecutions, burnings, mobbings, and beatings being put on the
      Saints must have been a worry to the young boy Edwin, as well as his family,
      but their testimonies remained strong.
      The Saints were preparing to leave in the Spring of 1846. The persecutions
      were so great that they begin leaving in February 1846. The Hamblins were not
      able to leave Nauvoo until summer. Edwin was baptized in May 1846 before they
      left Nauvoo.
      Three of Edwin's sisters had married and had died by this time. Olive Johnson
      died in 1839 in Ohio only a year or so after her marriage to Henry Johnson.
      Emily Fuller died in Wisconsin about 1845. Melissa Fuller died in 1845 in
      Illinois.
      By summer the Hamblins were able to follow the exiled Saints into
      Pottawattamie Co. Iowa. The first stopping place was on the banks of the
      Mississippi River. It was called Sugar City.
      Under Brigham Young's direction other camps were set up to help the thousands
      of Saints. The first place was called Garden City, 150 miles from Nauvoo. Seven
      hundred fifteen acres were broken up and planted to grain and other crops. Log
      houses were built in an orderly way. Most of Iowa was Public land and was
      unsurveyed so these settlements could be made easily and inexpensively. The
      Saints had brought large herds of cattle, sheep, pigs and chickens to provide
      them with food and wool for clothing.
      The first Saints at Garden Grove then moved to the second settlement, leaving
      homes and crops for those following. This settlement was made 100 miles to the
      northwest and was named Mt.Pisgah. Here several thousand acres were planted for
      the oncoming Saints to use. Many log houses were built and a town was laid
      out. This first group, after building and plainting, moved on to form a third
      place, Council Bluffs, Iowa. They reached here 14 Jun 1846. Again crops were
      planted and houses built.
      Across the river and a few miles on a fourth camp was made at Winter
      Quarters, Nebraska. There 538 log houses were built and 83 sod ones to shelter
      3000 people. By Spring there were 6000 people there. Most of the houses were 1
      room, 12' by 18' with sod floors and roofs and good chimneys.
      The Hamblins were not among the first groups of Saints who built and started
      these places but followed later.
      Isaiah, Jacob and other men of the family worked at what jobs they could find
      so they could outfit themselves to come further west. As the Hamblins were
      starting to leave for Council Bluffs in the Spring of 1847, Mother Daphney
      became ill. They waited a few days hoping she would get better. She didn't get
      better and died there. She was buried along the way in Iowa, with only a crude
      marker for her grave.
      Edwin was about 12 when his mother died. Francis was nine and Fredrick was
      about 5 or 6. About this time or shortly after, Jacob's wife Lucinda left him
      and their four children, making two motherless families.
      The young boys had the jobs of herding the cattle and sheep so Edwin probably
      did his share of this work.
      Some groups of Saints had already left for the West when the Hamblins
      arrived in Council Bluffs. William left for Utah with Elder George A. Smith
      helping as a driver. They left in 1848-49. Edwin's brother Obed had died in
      1848.
      Jacob married Rachel Judd in September 1849. By 1850, the Hamblins were ready
      to come to Utah. They joined the Aaron Johnson Company, leaving 12 Jun 1850.
      Edwin was then 15. He helped to drive the cattle on their journey. The others
      came in two wagons, Isaiah and sons in one and Jacob and family in the other
      one. Amerilla was married to James C. Littlefield in 1847. She came to Utah and
      went to Toole with the rest of the family. There she married John E. Riggs. I
      don't know what happened to the first husband.
      As the Hamblins began their trip cholera broke out in camp. Many became ill
      and some died. When Jacob's son Lyman got it, Isaiah Hamblin administered to
      him, then rebuked the destroyer and commanded it to leave Lyman, the family,
      and the company. There was no more cholera in the camp after that.
      As far as is known the trip was quite uneventful. Even so, they endured many
      hardships. There were the usual mosquitos, rain, mud, cold, heat, dust, hunger
      exhaustion and occasionaly hostile Indians. Their main food seemed to be
      cornmeal. Once in a while a buffalo was killed for meat. Also they had a
      antelope, rabbit or sagehen or some other bird. Across the great plains
      buffalo chips were gathered for fuel for their fires. Streams and rivers had to
      be crossed many times. Finally the mountains had to be climbed and decended.
      There were a lot mountains to be crossed at the final leg of the journey.
      At night the wagons formed circles, supper would be cooked, prayers said.
      Sometimes there would be dancing and singing before going to bed. All rose at
      the same time in the morning when they had their breakfast and prayers before
      beginning their trip again. They slept in or under the wagons.
      Many of the Indians they met looked kindly on them because they too, had been
      driven from their homes.
      In 1850 there were still nearly 8000 Saints in Iowa and over 11,000 in Utah.
      The Mormon Trail along the Platt River was on the North side, the Oregon
      Trail was on the South side. Many former enemies of the Saints were using the
      Oregon Trail on their way to the goldfields in California. At Fort Laramie,
      Wyoming they were one half of the way, being 543 miles from Winter Quarters.
      They'd made 400 miles of new road on the north side of the Platt River. There
      they ferried to the South side of the river and followed the Oregon Trail to
      Fort Bridger. From South Pass to the Green River the trip was more pleasant.
      There was more grass for the animals and the way was downhill.
      At Fort Bridger they left the Oregon Trail, followed the din trail of the
      Donner Party to Echo Canyon, to East Canyon, over Big Mt. into Parley's Canyon,
      over Little Mountain and into Emigration Canyon. From Big Mountain they got
      their first glimpse of the Salt Lake Valley.
      It must have been exiciting to see the huge herds of buffalo, sometimes with
      thousands in the herds. They saw many herds of antelope.
      At noon 31 August 1850 the Aaron Johnson Company came out of the canyon and
      looked out over the Great Salt Lake Valley, to see the farms, irrigation
      ditches and homes. This must have been a most welcome and exciting sight for
      them. Many wept for joy. They had at last reached Zion.
      The next day they came into Union Square where they all knelt in common
      prayer.
      The next spring the Hamblins were called to settle in Tooele Valley where
      many of the Aaron Johnson Company were called to settle.
      Tooele had been settled in 1849 under the leadership of John Rowberry and
      Cyrus Tolman. It is located about 35 miles southwest of Salt Lake City.
      In the 1851 census for Tooele it listed: Isaiah Hamblin, 61, born Mass.
      farmer, real estate $100; William 20, farmer, b. Ohio, Edward 16, b. Ohio,
      farmer, Francis 12, b. Wisc.; Frederick 10, b. Wisc.; Lydia 51, b. Maine.
      Evidently, Isaiah had remarried by then.
      In 1854 Jacob Hamblin was called to help settle southwestern Utah, in Santa
      Clara. He was called to work with the Indians establishing peace between the
      Indians and the Mormons. Oscar and family were called to help Jacob. Later the
      rest of the brothers and Isaiah moved to various settlements in Southern Utah.
      They helped settle Southern Nevada and Arizona also.
      While in Tooele, Edwin was a Minuteman to help with Indian trouble. 28 May
      1855 Edwin married Hannah Maria Cook. She was called Ann. She joined the LDS
      Church while in Cheltenham, Glous. England. She was baptised 30 Oct 1848. Her
      sister Catherine and her mother later were baptized. They, with the girl's
      brother Joseph Peter came to the USA. They left Liverpool England 1 Apr 1854 on
      the Marshfield. They arrived in New Orleans, LA. in May 1854. From there they
      sailed up the Mississippi River to St Louis, Mo. on the steamer James Robb. We
      don't know if the mother came to Utah or not, so far no record had been found.
      Joseph Peter, 14 stayed in St Louis. It was over 20 years later before Hannah
      heard any news from her brother. They came to Utah with the William Empey
      Company, leaving in June and arriving in Salt Lake City in October 1854. I
      wish we knew how Edwin and "Ann" met.
      They moved to Brigham City, Utah where their first child, a son, Obed Edwin,
      was born. Their second son, Isaiah was born in Wellsville, Utah.
      The following was written by Edwin's son William:
      My Father's Life Edwin Hamblin, the son of Isaiah Hamblin and Daphne Haynes
      Hamblin, was born in Bainbridge, Ohio 20 May 1835. He is the sole survior of a
      family of twelve children. Father was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ
      of Latter Day Saints by Uncle Jacob Hamblin in 1847. Arriving at the age
      fifteen he started for Salt Lake by oxteam in company with his father, brothers
      and sister; the wife and mother having previously passed away. They arrived at
      the destination 27 Sep 1850 overcoming many hardships and obstacles on the way.
      28 May 1855 witnessed his marriage to Hannah M. Cook at Tooele, Utah. In 1860
      they went to Salt Lake for the purpose of going through the Endowment House.
      Father planted the first peach tree ever planted both in Cache Valley and
      Brigham City but did not remain long enough at either place to reap the
      benefits of his labors. During 1859 he moved down into Southern Utah. He has
      lived the life of a pioneer, just remaining in one place long enough to subdue
      the earth, then leaving another the benefits of his toil.
      He had many thrilling experiences with the Indians during the pioneer life of
      Utah. This particular one which I am going to relate happened while father was
      still living in Cache Valley. One day while out alone loading wood, he was
      surrounded by seven armed Indians. They began shooting towards him. He
      immediately jumped between his ox team which was standing near. He started by
      poking first one then the other, all the while father was running between them
      dodging the bullets which were flying thick and fast. When a dence cloud of
      dust had arisen father dropped to the ground while the Indians still in hot
      pursuit. One of the Indians stepped on Father's hand as he passed. Before
      Father could get into town for help the Indians had caught the cattle, killed
      them, stripped the flesh from the bones, and carried it off to the mountains.
      In his dealings with the Indians he ... the rest of the history is lost.
      The Hamblins received a call to help settle the Santa Clara area about 1859.
      (Edwin and Family). It must have been quite an undertaking to move that far by
      covered wagon with two tiny tots. Of course, they'd had experience like that in
      crossing the plains to come to Utah. When the call came to leave their home and
      help settle new places, the faithful would pack up and leave home following
      their Prophet's call. All of Edwin's brothers helped settle in Southern Utah.
      Jacob had taken his father Iasiah to Santa Clara in the Spring of 1856. He
      died there in October 1856 and was buried in the red soil of the Santa Clara
      cemetery, overlooking the Valley.
      Santa Clara is below Cedar City. It was settled before St. George was. The
      soil was red, fertile, the climate quite mild. A dam had been made across the
      Santa Clara River for irrigation. A fort had been built. There were a few other
      families there, most of the other people around there were Indians. They lived
      among the Indians, ate roots, sometimes, hauled water from the river for use
      and endured other hardships of pioneer life. They had strong testimonies of
      the Restored Gospel to follow their Prophet's call to settle and develope these
      wilderness areas. It must have been hard to start over in new places so many
      times. Several other settements were made in the area, Pinto, Hebron,
      Pinevalley, Gunlock, Hamblin. The Edwin Hamblin family lived in most of them at
      one time or another.
      The 1860 census had Edwin Hamblin listed as living in Mt. Meadows. Their
      daughter Hannah was born 12 Dec 1859 in Santa Clara, Utah. They lived in Pinto
      several years. Daughters Catherine, Sarah Ann, Josephine and son JOSEPH PETER
      were born in Pinto between the years 1861 and 1866. They must have made a trip
      back to Salt Lake because they were sealed in the Endowment House 1 Nov 1862.
      In the Hebron Ward Records it says that Hyrum Hamblin was born to Edwin and
      Hannah Hamblin 1 Jun 1868 at Fort Hamblin. He died 2 Dec 1868. All that
      remains of Hamblin today is the small cemetery. No sign whatever of a town
      having been there.
      Their next child Emma was born 18 Dec 1869 at Gunlock, Utah. That town was
      named after Edwin's brother William Haines "Gunlock Bill" Hamblin. In the Utah
      1870 census it states that Edward Hamblin, 34, 10 in household residence Santa
      Clara, Utah.
      The family then moved to Clover Valley, Nevada. Later the name was changed to
      Barclay for the barclay soil there.
      There were about 15 families who settled there. They were members of the
      Hebron Ward, but a small Branch was orgainzed in Clover Valley.
      Clover Valley was first settled in 1864, but because of Indian troubles,
      people left until 1869 when Lyman Wood and Richard Bird and families moved back
      and were soon followed by other families. Clover Valley is in Southeastern
      Nevada, some 30 miles southeast of Panaca. It is a long Valley, with cedar
      covered hills along the sides. There was timber in the nearby hills and a
      sawmill was set up for awhile. Clover Valley is quite isolated. It was several
      days travel in a wagon to get to St. George, Utah, 80 miles away and a least
      two day to get to Panaca.
      The families in Clover Valley became almost self-sufficient. They cleared,
      leveled and broke up the new land to plant into crops. They raised wheat, hay,
      had dairy cows, chickens and probably had pigs and sheep. They all raised
      gardens. Cattle hides were used for shoe leather, boots and chaps, maybe coats.
      Farming was very primative. The grain was cut with a sythe, which had cradle
      on it to catch the grain as it fell.It was hand tied into sheaves with strands
      of straw. The sheaves were then stacked. Later they were threshed by being put
      on a canvas and beaten with a flail until the wheat separated from the straw
      and chaff. The straw was forked away, the grain falling onto the canvas. The
      wheat was then sacked, ready to be taken to the gristmill to be ground into
      flour.
      Later a thresher crew came to Clover Valley. It was powered by 10 large
      draft horses and by 5 crew members. The horses turned a wheel that turned the
      shaft to run the thresher. When the thresher crew came it was an occasion for
      feasting and socializing. Large meals were fixed and neighbors came and helped
      as needed.
      The nearest doctor was in Piocha, about a three day trip away. The Woods
      family helped in caring for the sick. Edwin also helped with the sick and
      administered to many.
      The nearby sawmill helped furnish lumber for the homes and building and also
      some work for some of the men.
      Life was hard for the women also. They had to make their own butter, cheese,
      soap, candles, cloth, rag rugs, etc. They made soap from wood ashes and fat.
      Shampoo was made from oose, form of Yucca. The roots were powdered and some
      water added.
      Most families had a few cows, sheep, pigs, chickens and a team of horses.
      Most of the women carded wool and spun their cloth. They spent knitting,
      quilting, soap and candle making, growing and preserving food weaving rag rugs.
      Doing the washing was an all day job, a backbreaking job. Water had to be
      heated either inside over the fire or outside where a fire was built under a
      big tub. The clothes were scrubbed by hand. Sometimes they boiled some clothes
      for a while. It is little wonder that so many of the poineer women died quite
      young and were often old by the age of fifty, if they lived to be that old.
      This was typical of the life that the Hamblins lived. Some of their neighbors
      were Indians who came to visit and ask for food.
      Church mettings were held, at first in the homes, as was school. Later a
      small log house was built for school and church meetings. About 1895, a one
      room frame schoolhouse was built and was used until the mid 1950's when there
      were children living there. It is still standing in 1983, but not in use.
      In 1871 a post office was built, also a school district was established. The
      name was then changed to Barclay although the is still known as Clover Valley.
      On 8 Jul 1872, another son was born to Edwin and Ann, William Haines.
      Possibly he was named for his uncle Bill Hamblin (Gunlock) who had died two
      months before. He is burried in Clover Valley. He was in Nevada and was to
      appear in court as a witness involving a mine case. Someone had put poison
      into his coffee. When he became sick he realized what had happened and he
      started for Clover Valley where his wife was. He died shortly after arriving
      there.
      Mary Ellen was born 6 Aug 1874. According to the Hebron Ward Records another
      son was born to the family, Parley Parker Pratt Hamblin on 27 Jun 1877 and died
      the same day. This son and Hyrum had never been listed with the family before
      but were found on the Hebron Ward Records about 1982.
      Besides farming, Edwin was a cooper. He made barrels, chests, churns, and
      other wooden items. He was very good at it. He would select the tree he
      wanted, cut it down, take it home and work it up into staves to make molasses
      barrels, churns or whatever was needed. If he didn't have the right tool he
      would make it. He made a small violen for his son William, who dearly loved it
      and learned to play it.
      Edwin's wife Hannah "Ann" died 15 Mar 1884, age 50. She is burried in Clover
      Valley Cemetery.
      Before she died Obed Edwin had married Margaret Adair 19 Jul 1883. Daughter
      Hannah had married Thomas W. Logan 27 May 1883. The responsibility for the
      family fell to 21 year old Catherine or Kate. She took care of the family for
      the next ten or twelve years. Around 1895 Kate along with several other
      brothers and sisters went to Teton Valley in Idaho. Sarah, who had married her
      cousin David Sinclair, JOSEPH PETER, Emma, who married Andrew Edwards, William,
      Mary Ellen, who married Alonzo Johnson all lived in Victor, Idaho for several
      years. Kate never marred until she was in her sixties. She helped some of the
      families. She ran a Hotel in Victor for awhile. She was a very good midwife.
      In the Hamblin Family by Franklin Andrews he said Edwin Hamblin was Justice
      of the Peace in Clover Valley for 9 or 10 years. I wrote to Lincoln County for
      records. The list didn't give his name but no one else was listed for the
      years of 1884-1895 either.
      Edwin's son-in-law David Sinclair was the first Bishop of the Victor Ward.
      Other sons-in-law, Alonzo Johnson and Andrew Edwards were also Bishops of
      Victor Ward. They later left Victor, Idaho.
      The railroad came through Clover Valley in 1889. By February 1890, a supply
      camp had been set up, also a temporary hospital, boardinghouse and a dugout
      saloon for the railroad workers. By July when the grading was done the camp
      moved on, leaving Clover more quiet and peaceful again.
      A sawmill had been set up. By September they were ready to lay the rails,
      Perhaps some of the Hamblins found work on the railroads or in the sawmill.
      Work stopped for awhile because of the 1893 Panic. A few years later work was
      resumed. The railroad is still in use today (1984).
      By the mid 90's the timber had been pretty well used up and the land
      overgrazed. Perhaps that is why so many of the Hamblins left Clover Valley. I
      think Obed Edwin and his family stayed there, also Isaiah, who never married,
      remained there. Hannah, who married Thomas Logan moved from there, but stayed
      in Nevada.
      A grandson of Edwin's, Cryil Hamblin, wrote the following:
      Edwin Hamblin was a good man, honest, hardowrking, patient, kind, consider-
      ate and very humble. He had a good sense of humor and a twinkle in his eye. I
      was blessed by having the privilege of spending two winters with my
      grandfather.One of them was in 1907-08 at his home in the Beaver Dams. (at
      one time the Hamblins had a farm at the top of the Beaver Dams-now there is a
      Beaver Dam State Park there.) The other was in 1922-23 after he had built a
      home and moved to St. George, Ut. He built this home himself at age 70.
      Mother, Dad and five of us noisy kids lived with him that winter on the
      Beaver Dams. He didn't seem to mind the noise and confusion at all. I don't
      remember of ever hearing him raise his voice or utter one cross word all the
      time I was around him. He was very quiet, never the less he was quite witty
      and had a fine sense of humor.
      I shall never forget the times we would gather around the fireplace to pop
      corn and listen to Grandpa with a twinkle in his eye, tell us stories as no
      one else could. He and Dad could certainly make an evening pass much to
      fast.
      I guess I will have to tell a story that Dad used to tell on Grandfather.
      There was an Indian, many Indians for that matter, who lived close to the
      ranch. This one they called Peter Indian. He spent a lot of time around
      the place. One day while Grandpa, Uncle Obed, Dad and others were sitting
      around the table eating dinner, Old Peter Indian came down from his camp and
      was puttering around the woodpile in front of the house. Grandpa was sitting
      at the back of the table facing the door and woodpile. Uncle Obed finished
      first so went out to saw some wood. The Indian had been doing something that
      Uncle Obed didn't like so he gave him a shove and told him to go home, then
      turning his back he proceeded to cut the wood.
      Instead of going home Old Peter Indian picked up an ax that was lying there
      and started for Uncle Obed with it. Grandfather sprang over the table and
      through the door in two leaps, grabbed a rock and threw it, hitting the Indian
      behind the ear. The Indian dropped the ax, whirled around a few times, then
      lit out for his wickey-up. By this time he was really mad. Grandfather set
      out after him. He found him stuffing powder into his muzzle loader. Grandpa
      had to do a lot of talking to persuade him to unload the gun and put it away.
      In 1933, while on a mission for the LDS church in Colorado and New Mexico,
      James E. Hamblin, grandson of Edwin, met Dudley Hamblin, a nephew of Edwin.
      Dudley told James the following stories about Edwin. Dudley said that he had
      a bad knee which was very painful. Edwin dreamed of a certain kind of plant
      that would heal his knee. Edwin went out and found some of it, which he
      prepared and wrapped around the painful knee. That made his knee feel better
      and Dudley was finally able to get a good nights sleep, the first in quite
      some time.
      The other story he hold was about a time when some Indians were mad at the
      Ditchrider, and were planning on killing him. Edwin went to talk to the
      Indians. He talked to them all night, thus allowing the Ditchrider to get
      away. Edwin was the only man there at the fort at that time, with the women
      and children. They were afraid that Edwin may be killed.
      Dudley and his sister Anna spoke of meeting Edwin's daughters Kate and
      Hannah.
      During pioneer times when doctors were unavailable Edwin did a lot of good
      work for the sick, never failing to go and do his best when called upon.
      It is possible that Edwin lived in Enterprise for a while either near or
      with his daughter Emma Edwards. Emma died there in 1912. At Edwin's funeral
      one of the speakers mentioned having known Edwin at Enterprise.
      Near that time Edwin moved to St. George, Utah and built his own home there
      when he was about 70 years old. The house is still being lived in, remodled
      some. (1938) His daughter Kate lived with him there. They spent a lot of
      time doing temple work in the St. George Temple.
      At one time Edwin made a trip to Victor, Idaho to see members of his
      family. It was after 1917, after son William and family left there.
      Velma Edwards Hall lived with Edwin and Aunt Kate for a while after her
      mother died. She remembers her Grandfather as being quite tall, walking with
      his hands clasped behind his back, leaning slightly forward. She remembered
      one time when a mouse ran up his pant leg and how excited he got. Another
      time Velma had some baby kittens. She had covered them with a cloth. Her
      grandfather didn't know the kittens were there and he stepped on them,
      killing them. Velma was broken hearted and so was her grandfather.

      Edwin outlived all of his brothers and sisters and some of his children. He
      died January 12, 1925 in St. George, Utah, nearly 90 years of age. He had
      lived a good, honest and useful life, setting a good example for all of his
      decendants. He is buried in St. George, Utah.

      The following was written about him in the St. George newspaper:
      Edwin Hambilin was of a quiet, retiring nature and for this reason did not
      take much part in public affairs. He was an active temple worker and a
      devoted Latter Day Saint. He had lived in St. George the last thirteen
      years of his life and was of irreproachable character.

      Funeral Services:
      Funeral Services for brother Edwin Hamblin who died Jan. 12 1925 were held
      in St. George Tabernacle at 2pm Wednesday, conducted by Bishop James McArther.
      The choir sang "When First The Glorious Light of Truth". Prayer was offerd by
      Elder Arther K. Hafen. The choir then sang "Rock of Ages".
      Elder Si Leavitt said Edwin was a good man and a good friend; had known him
      since he could remember, first at Clover Valley, Later at St. George and Enter-
      prise. He was steady in his belief ...took pleasure in saying he had known
      Brother when he (the speaker) was a young man, at his home in Clover Valley and
      was at his home many times and he knew him better in later years in St. George.
      He, with his brother, Jacob Hamblin came here when there was no one but
      savages; they lived with the Indians, ate roots etc., and underwent great
      hardships of pioneer life, all for the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
      Edwin was not so well known as was his brother Jacob Hamblin, who did more
      than any one man to make and keep peace with the Indians. Edwin Hamblin was a
      good man and always had a testimony of the Gospel; he had done a wonderful work
      in settling and helping to subdue this country. He was nearly ninety years old
      and his body was worn out, his time had come to leave. The Speaker prayed for
      God's blessings on the family. The choir sang "We Shall Meet Beyond the River"
      Bishop McArther said in part; From what we know of this brother and his life
      we can believe that he earned a reward in the Celestial Kingdom. He was born
      after the Church was organized; there are not many left who enlisted in this
      great work at this time. If we expect to attain Celestial Glory we must live as
      this man lived. According to the speakers this afternoon he wanted to do the
      Masters work, had faith in Brigham Young, and went to and fro as directed by
      the Authorities. Jacob and his brother came here because of their faith; they
      took their lives in their hands when they settled here among the Indians. They
      secured for themselves Celestial Glory. It was worth the price they paid in
      the sacrifice of earthy joys and blessings. He did not have to come here and
      settle on the Santa Clara Creek, but chose to render obedience and made it
      possible for us to come here and live in peace.
      The Bishop prayed for God to Sanctify his memory to us, that his children
      should revere his memory. He lived a plain, humble life and was true to the
      faith. Choir sang "There is Sweet Rest In Heaven". The benidiction was by
      George W. Worthen.

      From the Improvement Era January 26, 1925:
      Edwin Hamblin's death is more that the going of an individual, it is the
      passing of an institution--one no longer understood and appreciated now, tis
      true, but an institution that was very, very useful in its day in the West.
      When Brigham Young came with the pioneers to Utah he saw that it was cheaper to
      feed the Indians than to fight them. This required a lot of men to go on to
      the frontier and learn the Indian language, the Indian ways and to get their
      confidence. He picked Jacob Hamblin, the greatest of them all, Thales
      Haskells, Ira Hatch, Edwin Hamblin and later Dan Jones, to go to Arizona and
      A.E. Teitjen to go to New Mexico and make this their life's work. To do this
      they gave up all that most civilized people think is best in life, but they did
      go and they were devoted--devoted to the church, White friends left behind and
      to the Indians among whom they went. With the passing of Edwin Hamblin, all
      the older ones are gone and only A.E. (Hans) Teitjen of the younger ones is
      left. Those men saved lives by the thousands. In the whole settlement of the
      West, none were more useful. In my opinion there is no more honored grave in
      all the West than that of Jacob Hamblin, at Alpine, Arizona, and that of Edwin
      Hamblin in St. George, deserves to be classed with it.
      George H. Crosby Jr. Green River, Wyoming

      AS I KNEW HIM

      Edwin, as I know him, was a man of quiet ways,
      Kind and honest, friendly, faithful, seeking justice all his days;
      Pioneer of Church and country, minister of souls and sod,
      By his daily life inspiring faith in mankind and in God.

      Edwin and his brother Jacob were of those four pioneers
      First to settle Santa Clara on those grim and trying years
      E're the savages were friendly; teaching them the ways of peace,
      Harvesting at length, with gladness, all the promised "Rich increase".

      If a man asked Edwin Hamblin for a lift along the road
      Just a mile, he'd bear a dozen, bearing half the load.
      Oft, unaskedm he rendered service with a willing hand;
      Leaving thus his memory graven on the hearts of Dixieland.

      There may never be a tablet builded to prolong his name,
      But his deeds were monumental, sending forth a living flame;
      And the pioneer and Redman, Conquered stream and yeilding soil,
      Bless the name of Edwin Hamblin, for his life of faith and toil.
      (Written for Brigham Jarvis Sr. by his daughter Mabel in loving memory of the
      splendid life of Edwin Hamblin)

      compled by ILa Vee H. Larsen
      Star Route Box 7
      Roosevelt, Ut. 84066
    Person ID I1484  Our Family
    Last Modified 29 Mar 2013 

    Father Ancestors Isaiah Hamblin 2x ,   b. 20 Jun 1790, Falmouth, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Oct 1856, Santa Clara, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years) 
    Mother Ancestors Daphne Haines Haynes,   b. 29 Aug 1797, North Hero, Grand Isle, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Aug 1847, , Pottawattamie, Iowa, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years) 
    Married 30 Nov 1811  North Hero, Grand Isle, Vermont, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F160  Group Sheet

    Family Ancestors Hannah Mariah Anna Cook,   b. 20 Oct 1834, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Mar 1884, Clover Valley, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years) 
    Married 28 May 1855  Tooele, Tooele, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence Family 1940  Victor, Teton, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Obed Edwin Hamblin,   b. 13 Nov 1856, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Dec 1917, Barclay, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
     2. Isaiah Hamblin,   b. 7 Nov 1857, Wellsville, Cache, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1902  (Age 44 years)
    Family3. Hannah Mariah Hamblin,   b. 12 Dec 1859, Santa Clara, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jul 1942, Verdi, Washoe, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
    Family4. Catherine Kate Munsell Hamblin,   b. 1 Nov 1861, Pinto, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jan 1939, Saint George, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
    +5. Sarah Ann Sadie Hamblin,   b. 1 Aug 1864, Pinto, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Apr 1915, Sugar City, Madison, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years)
    +6. Josephine Hamblin,   b. 9 Nov 1864, Pinto, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jul 1908, Panaca, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years)
    +7. Joseph Peter Hamblin,   b. 28 Nov 1866, Pinto, Iron, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Dec 1936, Draper, Salt Lake, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     8. Hyrum Hamblin,   b. 1 Jun 1868, Fort Hamblin, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Dec 1868  (Age 0 years)
    +9. Emma Elizabeth Hamblin,   b. 18 Dec 1869, Gunlock Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Nov 1912, Enterprise, Washington, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years)
    +10. William Haines Hamblin,   b. 8 Jul 1872, Clover Valley, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 May 1951, Roosevelt, Duchesne, Utah, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
    +11. Mary Ellen Hamblin,   b. 6 Aug 1874, Clover Valley, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Jun 1942, Victor, Teton, Idaho, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
     12. Parley Parker Pratt Hamblin,   b. 27 Jun 1877, Clover Valley, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jun 1877, Clover Valley, Lincoln, Nevada, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 9 Mar 2014 
    Family ID F419  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsDied - 12 Jan 1925 - Saint George, Washington, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 14 Jan 1925 - Saint George City Cemetery, Saint George, Washington, Utah, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence Family - 1940 - Victor, Teton, Idaho, United States Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Hamblin. Edwin 1835-1925
    Hamblin. Edwin 1835-1925

  • Sources 
    1. [S100] Find A Grave (Reliability: 3), 9 Jan 2011.
      Birth: May 20, 1835
      Bainbridge (Geauga County)
      Geauga County
      Ohio, USA
      Death: Jan. 12, 1925
      Saint George
      Washington County
      Utah, USA

      The following was written by Edwin's son William:

      "My Father's Life. Edwin Hamblin, the son of Isaiah Hamblin and Daphne Haynes Hamblin, was born in Bainbridge, Ohio, May 20, 1835. He is the sole survivor of a family of twelve children. Father was baptized in to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, by Uncle Jacob Hamblin in 1847. Arriving at the age of fifteen he started for Salt Lake by ox-team in company with his father, brothers and sister; the wife and mother having previously passed away. They arrived at their destination September 27, 1850 overcoming many hardships and obstacles on the way. May 28, 1855 witnessed his marriage to Hannah M. Cook at Tooele, Utah. In 1860 they went to Salt Lake for the purpose of going through the Endowment House. Father planted the first peach tree ever planted both in Cache Valley and Brigham City, but did not remain long enough at either place to reap the benefits of his labors. During 1859 he moved down into Southern Utah. He has lived the life of a pioneer, just remaining in one place long enough to subdue the earth, then leaving another the benefits of his toil.

      Edwin and Family, received a call to help settle the Santa Clara area about 1859. It must have been quite an undertaking to move that far by covererd wagon with two tiny tots. Of course they'd had experience like that in crossing the plains to come to Utah. When the call came to leave their home and help settle new places, the faithful would pack up and leave home following their prophets call. All of Edwin's brothers helped settle in Southern Utah.

      A grandson of Edwin`s, Cryil Hamblin, wrote the following:

      'Edwin Hamblin was a good man, honest, hardworking, patient, kind, considerate and very humble. He had a good sense of humor and a twinkle in his eye. I was blessed by having the privilege of spending two winters with my grandfather. One of them was in 1907-08 at his home in the Beaver Dams. (at one time the Hamblins had a farm at the top f the Beaver Dams-now there is a Beaver Dam State Park there.) The other was in 1922-23 after he had built a home and moved to St. Geoge, Ut. He built this home himself at age 70. Mother, Dad and five of us noisy kids lived with him that winter on the Beaver Dams. He didn`t seem to mind the noise and confusion at all. I don`t remember of ever hearing him raise his voice or utter one cross word all the time I was around him. He was very quiet, never the less he was quite witty and had a fine sense of humor.




      Family links:
      Parents:
      Isaiah Hamblin (1790 - 1856)
      Dephine Haynes Hamblin (1797 - 1847)

      Children:
      Obed Edwin Hamblin (1856 - 1917)*
      Isaiah Hamblin (1857 - 1902)*
      Hannah Mariah Hamblin Logan (1859 - 1942)*
      Joseph Peter Hamblin (1860 - 1936)*
      Katherine Mansell Hamblin Cheney (1861 - 1939)*
      Sarah Ann Hamblin Sinclair (1864 - 1915)*
      Josephine Hamblin Rice (1864 - 1908)*
      Hyrum Hamblin (1868 - 1868)*
      William Haines Hamblin (1872 - 1951)*
      Mary Ella Hamblin Johnson (1874 - 1942)*
      Parley Parker Pratt Hamblin (1877 - 1877)*

      Spouse:
      Hannah M. Cook Hamblin (1834 - 1884)*

      Burial:
      Saint George City Cemetery
      Saint George
      Washington County
      Utah, USA
      Plot: B_1_12_3

      Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]

      Maintained by: Ann Hamblin
      Originally Created by: Utah State Historical So...
      Record added: Feb 02, 2000
      Find A Grave Memorial# 109954
      I have the photo of the headstone
      plot number given